Forum Posts

Megan Raff
Jun 30, 2021
In Recipe & Menu Ideas
Looking for ideas when it comes to substituting potatoes in general, whether in soups, as a mash, or in a salad. My go-to is cauliflower: any other good ones you use?
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Megan Raff
Jan 18, 2021
In Backyard Chickens Love
We've definitely not received our normal rainfall this winter; but when it's raining, it's pouring. We're still struggling with some muddy areas of the farm, and trying to find ways to manage that wet soil before it becomes a bog. We have used straw and sand to help dry things up, which does a decent job. What are some of your tricks when your chicken run gets wet?
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Megan Raff
Feb 19, 2018
In Urban Farming
Who has experience with edible landscaping - either through profession or previous experience? We love to encourage self-sustaining habits, first through backyard chicken keeping, but also composting, and urban gardening. Sometimes, however, municiple laws or HOA regulations disallow raised beds and urban gardens in the yard where it's visible from the street. Tomatoes, squash, and corn might be out, but there are still lots of great plants that have longevity, beauty, reasonable water requirements, and can be direct sown into the ground! Here are some of the fun plants we've found can be integrated into the garden to provide organic food while still maintaining a landscaped look and feel? Grape Vines Table grapes or wine grapes create a beautiful and cozy European feel trellised up a fence or over a pergola. Fruit Trees Apples, Nectarines and Peaches are popular fruits to harvest and blossom with beautiful flowers in the early spring. Citrus trees like lemon or orange are popular because they don't lose their leaves and still provide fruit, making for a resourceful and gorgeous focal point in the yard. Herbs Lots of herbs require little water and maintenance and still grow beautifully, providing delicious flavors for your home-cooked meals. Mint can be somewhat invasive, but grown in a contained area, it creates an excellent aroma and also is great at keeping rodents at bay, or for making mojitos! Rosemary, sage, and thyme require little care, and can be used as a border, or a plant under the window by the kitchen to be harvested for an authentic Italian red sauce. Lavendar, chamomile, and calendula are beautiful flowering plants that can be used to make dried herbs for teas and aromatherapy. Leafy Greens Colorful purple, green, and red leafy greens look gorgeous in the yard, almost like small flowering plants or frilly miniature trees. Try different lettuces, cabbages, or kales for amazing home grown salads. Instead of harvesting the entire plant at once, try harvesting just the lowest or outermost leaves, allowing the plant to continue to grow and provide more food. What kind of edible landscaping have you used successfully in an urban area?
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Megan Raff
Aug 17, 2017
In Recipe & Menu Ideas
Our cucumber plants are producing like crazy this year, and we can't use them enough. We've made lots of different kinds of pickles (dill, curry, spicy, and more) and drank lots of cucumber water. But the best creation came from Rachel Meeker, who substituted cucumber for zucchini in a lemon zucchini bread recipe and topped it with frosting for the most dense, moist cake I've had in recent memory! Today it will be available at our farm stand from noon to dark! Come grab a slice if you're in the area :D
New Favorite Cake Recipe: Cucumber Lemon Cake content media
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Megan Raff
Jul 17, 2017
In Recipe & Menu Ideas
We have LOTS of lettuces, kale, and chard, and we're constantly trying to find new ways to keep our salads interesting. I love the flavors of tomatoes with basil, so anytime I've added tomatoes to the salads, I've also added a garnish of basil. But I've realized that it's such a treat to have basil in salads that I've begun adding it regularly to the salads to keep the flavor of the salad mix interesting without having to add lots of dressing or other ingredients. I like to chiffonade basil leaves to keep the flavors simple and bright. Any other ideas for salad mixes with herbs?
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Megan Raff
Jun 07, 2017
In Backyard Chickens Love
We raise hundreds of baby chicks every week. But sometimes my mind wanders to an imaginary time that I keep, feed, clean, name and love only a handful of birds, like when we first started our chicken adventure-turned-farm. I absolutely love Barred Rocks. And everyone should have an Easter Egger for blue/green eggs. But if I could only pick two others, what would they be? I think I would keep a Golden Sexlink and a Buff Orpington - the perfect mix of egg production and cuddles.
What are the best backyard chicken breeds?  content media
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Megan Raff
Jun 07, 2017
In Backyard Chickens Love
There's really no magic like watching kids and chickens. My son Wyatt, 2.5, calls the baby chicks "boco chicks", and if I turn to answer an email, he's out the back door, through the garden gate and on the way to the barn. He doesn't sit still for much, but if you hand him a chicken, he is so happy and calm. Any other moms out there see the transformation with their kids?
Kids & Chicks content media
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Megan Raff
Jun 07, 2017
In Recipe & Menu Ideas
Kohlrabi is as strange to most CSA members and farmers market goers as it looks in the garden: like a spaceship. The first way I ever tried it was by peeling it and eating thin slices of it plain. It tastes very much like broccoli stem (it is also a brassica), which I love, so plain works for me. But variety is the spice of life, so I'd love some new ideas! Any suggestions?
Exactly what does one do with kohlrabi? content media
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Megan Raff
Jun 07, 2017
In Recipe & Menu Ideas
I'm a sucker for warm salads. Sauteed mushrooms? Yep! Hot chicken? Mmhmm. So, when I had to throw something together with nothing for a Community Gardening Day lunch, it's no surprise I defaulted straight to a new warm salad creation. This is my favorite mid-summer salad when the choices for tomatoes are endless, the kale plants turn into trees, and the stockpile of squash gets as tall as me. Note: It's wonderful with almost any kind of tomato, including cherry varieties, and for those who don't like peppers *Ahem, husband*, feel free to leave them out! Meg's Butternut and Dino Kale Salad Ingredients 1 large butternut squash 2 small yellow bell peppers 4 cloves minced garlic ½ cup melted butter 1 cup quinoa 1 bunch Genovese Basil 2 large bunches Dinosaur Kale 2 large heirloom tomatoes, diced Avocado Oil or Olive Oil Balsamic Vinegar Salt & Pepper Instructions 1. Preheat oven to 375˚ 2. Peel butternut squash, cut in half, and clean out the seeds. Chop into 1 inch cubes and place cubes in oiled baking dish. Drizzle lightly with 3 tbsp oil. Coat with melted butter and top with minced garlic. Season with ½ tbsp salt and pepper. Stir squash to coat and season cubes evenly. Bake uncovered for a total of one hour. 3. Chop bell peppers into long thin slices. After 30 minutes of baking squash, add peppers to squash and stir together. 4. Cook one cup quinoa in 2 cups water, stirring occasionally, until water is fully absorbed, let cool. 5. Slice basil into long thin strips using a Chiffonade method 6. Chop kale into long thin strips 7. Combine kale, basil, tomatoes, and quinoa. Drizzle with oil and balsamic vinegar, season with salt and pepper, and toss. 8. Top with butternut squash and bell peppers, and toss gently. What are your favorite ways to use up a bin full of kale?
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Megan Raff
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