Dare 2 Dream Forum

Feb 20, 2018

Brand new flock

5 comments

Edited: Feb 20, 2018

My husband and I are starting to build our chicken coop and and area that is just for them. They will be allowed to be free range in our back yard. We want 4 girls but are not sure what breeds would be best and if we should just stick with one breed or get 4 different breeds. We feel the Sexlinks would be great for us since we use a lot of eggs, however we are open. What would you recommend?

Feb 20, 2018

Great question! You can get four of one breed, but it does become a bit hard to tell them apart; and if they're like most backyard chickens, they'll have names and personalities you'll attach to them so its fun to be able to tell them apart. So I recommend purchasing four separate breeds: there are quite a few we can recommend if you're interested in great egg producers, good foragers, and friendly birds. We carry two colors of Sexlinks, Golden and Black. You might also enjoy Rhode Island Reds and Barred Plymouth Rocks which are the parent stock of Black Sexlinks. Both are exceptionally good layers, excellent foragers, hardy, intelligent, and interactive with humans. Easter Eggers are fun if you'd like to collect colored (blue/green) eggs. New Hampshire Reds and Black Australorps are just slightly less productive than the Sexlinks, Rhode Islands, and Barred Rocks, but can still be considered great layers, and otherwise have all the same wonderful characteristics of those breeds. It's tough to decide. If you need some photos, hop on over to the Breeds Index. The Guide to Choosing Breeds can also be helpful :) Welcome to the Forum!

I guess I thought they may not do well unless they had ones of there same breed. However that makes sense. I am excited to read a bit more on the breeds you named. thank you so much.

Feb 20, 2018

Happy to help! You're right that there are some breeds that don't get along all the time. But these breeds should all be just fine together.

Sorry one more question, for 2 adults and sometimes our dogs. How many chickens would you recommend? we do eat a lot of eggs and sometimes the dogs get one too.

Feb 21, 2018

No problem :) It depends on how many eggs you go through in a week. Each of those great egg layers will give you approximately 6-7 eggs per week, so you'll get a dozen eggs for every two chickens you have. If you use a couple dozen eggs each week between your breakfasts and your pups, then four chickens would be perfect!

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