Kohlrabi

Spring, Fall, Winter

Health Benefits

This delectable vegetable is high in vitamin C and B6. It is also a good source of fiber, potassium, and high in minerals such as copper and manganese.

History

Kohlrabi originated in northwestern Europe, most likely in Germany, and is a member of the cabbage family. It has a large edible bulb that resembles a turnip. The word kohlrabi literally translates to “cabbage turnip”. Some people think the turnip and kohlrabi share a similar taste, while others compare the taste of kohlrabi to that of cucumber and broccoli.

Recipes to Try

How to Store

Bulbs will preserve in your refrigerator for several weeks, but tend to become woodier the longer they are stored. Remove leaves before storing. The leaves can be sautéed, boiled, steamed, or appreciated raw. Kohlrabi will keep for 2-3 days when refrigerated. Pickling or fermentation are other methods of storing kohlrabi. You can even freeze this nutritious vegetable for later use.

How to Prepare

Kohlrabi is very simple to prepare. First, cut off the stems. Next, peel the tough outer layer of the bulb with a vegetable peeler. Cut the kohlrabi into quarters and use the tip of your knife to cut through the core. Discard the tough center. Then, cut the quarter sections into thick, thin, or matchbox slices.

Ways to Enjoy

Kohlrabi can be enjoyed several ways. The bulb can be grilled, pureed in soup, shredded with cheese and egg, steamed, barbecued, stir-fried, quartered and roasted like potatoes, or consumed raw (mildly spicy, like radishes) and tossed in a delicious salad.

Health Benefits

This delectable vegetable is high in vitamin C and B6. It is also a good source of fiber, potassium, and high in minerals such as copper and manganese.

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