Celeriac

Spring, Fall

Health Benefits

Celeriac is a good source of fiber, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. It is also packed with vitamins B1, B2 and E.

History

Celeriac has had medicinal and religious uses in several early civilizations, including those of Egypt, Greece, and Italy. This vegetable did not gain significance until the Middle-Ages and was first recorded as a plant for food in France, 1623. By the 17th century, celeriac was commonly cultivated in most of Europe and was introduced to America in the 19th century.

Recipes to Try

How to Store

Celeriac can be kept refrigerated in a plastic bag for 2 to 3 weeks.

How to Prepare

Scrub and wash the root in cold running water to remove surface sand and soil. Trim off the top and base of the root. Next, remove the skin (this part is not edible). Then, wash and peel root like a potato. To avoid discoloration, immerse the cut celeriac into a bowl of water with lemon or vinegar until ready for use.

Ways to Enjoy

Celeriac (sometimes referred to as celery root) is grown especially for its crisp, white fleshed, knobby root. When peeled, the flesh has a nutty and sweet flavor with a delicate celery twist. Celeriac is a hearty and versatile vegetable that can be enjoyed many different ways. Try it boiled, braised, roasted, steamed, stewed, blanched, mashed or raw. Try shredded in salads or slaws, simmered in stews, baked in gratins, boiled and mashed with potatoes, or added to casseroles and other savory dishes.

Health Benefits

Celeriac is a good source of fiber, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. It is also packed with vitamins B1, B2 and E.

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