Brussels Sprouts

Spring, Fall, Winter

Health Benefits

The organic compound responsible for the odor of overcooked Brussels sprouts is the same compound found to be responsible for fighting cancer. When the sprouts aren't overcooked, they don't produce the sulfuric odor, and still provide a heavy dose of vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, folic acid, magnesium, fiber, beta carotene, and selenium.

History

While the earlier versions of the vegetable date back to ancient Rome, the vegetable as we know it was widely cultivated in Belgium and named after its capital, Brussels.

Recipes to Try

How to Store

Brussels sprouts keep the longest on the stem, but in a bag can be kept in a cool and humid place, like the crisper drawer in your refrigerator. The sprouts will keep for about 4-5 days.

How to Prepare

Pluck the sprouts from the stem if still attached. Using a sharp knife, remove the stem of the Brussels sprout from the bottom, and then peel any yellowing or wilted outer leaves.

Ways to Enjoy

Whole Brussels sprouts can be steamed, pan-roasted, or broiled. Add cooking stock and white wine to braise them in the oven. The leaves can also be peeled from the bulb and crisped into crunchy fries. They go great with bacon, chestnuts, garlic, and cheese. Avoid overcooking them to prevent the sulfuric smell associated with cooking Brussels sprouts.

Health Benefits

The organic compound responsible for the odor of overcooked Brussels sprouts is the same compound found to be responsible for fighting cancer. When the sprouts aren't overcooked, they don't produce the sulfuric odor, and still provide a heavy dose of vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, folic acid, magnesium, fiber, beta carotene, and selenium.

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